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Term or phrase Big Data
Language English
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Description of metaphor, metonym, or other figurative expression Most of the metaphors we use to talk about data in popular culture make sense to technocratic corporations and their leaders, those building and disseminating information technologies, but they are fundamentally dehumanizing. It is no wonder individuals continue to believe that they have “nothing to hide” in the face of big data, because we do not have the cognitive context to grasp how behemoth corporations use data. The dominant industrial metaphors for data do not privilege the position of the individual. Instead, they take power away from the person to which the data refers and give it to those who have the tools to analyze and interpret data. Data then becomes obscured, specialized, and distanced.
Is the text of the description a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
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Or was the source of the description online? If so, insert the source here. Watson, Sara M., “Data is the New ‘___’: Sara M. Watson on the Industrial Metaphors of Big Data,” DIS Magazine, accessed October 9, 2015, http://dismagazine.com/discussion/73298/sara-m-watson-metaphors-of-big-data/
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Related terms and phrases metaphor, popular, culture, popular culture, data, data analysis, interpretation, industrial, dehumanize, build, disseminate, information technology, information, technology, cognitive, context, behemoth, corporation, individual, power, person, refer to, tool, analyze, interpret, obscure, specialize, distance
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Definition Big Data involves processing very large datasets to identify patterns and connections in the data. It's made possible by the incredible amount of data that is generated, accumulated, and analyzed every day with the help of ever-increasing computer power and ever-cheaper data storage. It uses the "data exhaust" that all of us leave behind through our daily lives.
Dialects or regional variations
Is the text of the definition a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Source of definition in print Gurin, Joel, Open Data Now: The Secret to Hot Startups, Smart Investing, Savvy Marketing, and Fast Innovation (New York: McGraw-Hill Education, 2014), 12 (italics omitted)
Significant terms and phrases big, data, dataset, storage, data storage, exhaust, data exhaust, identify, pattern, connection, generate, accumulate, analyze, computer, power, computer power, cheap, daily life
Definition Big data is a collection of data from traditional and digital sources inside and outside your company that represents a source for ongoing discovery and analysis.
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Is the text of the definition a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Source of definition online Lisa Arthur, “What Is Big Data?” Forbes, August 15, 2013, accessed August 21, 2015, http://www.forbes.com/sites/lisaarthur/2013/08/15/what-is-big-data/
Significant terms and phrases big, data, collection, traditional, digital, source, inside, outside, company, discovery, analysis
Definition “Big data” refers to datasets whose size is beyond the ability of typical database software tools to capture, store, manage, and analyze. This definition is intentionally subjective and incorporates a moving definition of how big a dataset needs to be in order to be considered big data—i.e., we don’t define big data in terms of being larger than a certain number of terabytes (thousands of gigabytes). We assume that, as technology advances over time, the size of datasets that qualify as big data will also increase. Also note that the definition can vary by sector, depending on what kinds of software tools are commonly available and what sizes of datasets are common in a particular industry. With those caveats, big data in many sectors today will range from a few dozen terabytes to multiple petabytes (thousands of terabytes).
Dialects or regional variations
Is the text of the definition a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Source of definition online Manyika, James, et al., Big data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity (n.p.: McKinsey Global Institute, 2011), 1, Aug. 21, 2015, http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/business_technology/big_data_the_next_frontier_for_innovation
Significant terms and phrases big, data, database, gigabyte, terabyte, petabyte, size, ability, typical, database, software, tool, capture, store, manage, analyze, definition, subjective, incorporate, dataset, define, in terms of, large, technology, advance, time, qualify, increase, vary, sector, industry, caveat

Connections to this term or phrase

The following pages have some connection to "Big Data": Open Data (English, noun).

The following pages include "Big Data" as an antecedent term or phrase: .

The following pages include "Big Data" as a synonym: .

The following pages include "Big Data" as a translation equivalent: .

Facts about "Big Data (English, noun)"RDF feed
Has connection to term or phrasemetaphor +, popular +, culture +, popular culture +, data +, data analysis +, interpretation +, industrial +, dehumanize +, build +, disseminate +, information technology +, information +, technology +, cognitive +, context +, behemoth +, corporation +, individual +, power +, person +, refer to +, tool +, analyze +, interpret +, obscure +, specialize +, distance +, big +, dataset +, storage +, data storage +, exhaust +, data exhaust +, identify +, pattern +, connection +, generate +, accumulate +, computer +, computer power +, cheap +, daily life +, collection +, traditional +, digital +, source +, inside +, outside +, company +, discovery +, analysis +, database +, gigabyte +, terabyte +, petabyte +, size +, ability +, typical +, software +, capture +, store +, manage +, definition +, subjective +, incorporate +, define +, in terms of +, large +, advance +, time +, qualify +, increase +, vary +, sector +, industry + and caveat +
Has definitionBig Data involves processing very large daBig Data involves processing very large datasets to identify patterns and connections in the data. It's made possible by the incredible amount of data that is generated, accumulated, and analyzed every day with the help of ever-increasing computer power and ever-cheaper data storage. It uses the "data exhaust" that all of us leave behind through our daily lives.f us leave behind through our daily lives., Big data is a collection of data from traditional and digital sources inside and outside your company that represents a source for ongoing discovery and analysis. and “Big data” refers to datasets whose size i“Big data” refers to datasets whose size is beyond the ability of typical database software tools to capture, store, manage, and analyze. This definition is intentionally subjective and incorporates a moving definition of how big a dataset needs to be in order to be considered big data—i.e., we don’t define big data in terms of being larger than a certain number of terabytes (thousands of gigabytes). We assume that, as technology advances over time, the size of datasets that qualify as big data will also increase. Also note that the definition can vary by sector, depending on what kinds of software tools are commonly available and what sizes of datasets are common in a particular industry. With those caveats, big data in many sectors today will range from a few dozen terabytes to multiple petabytes (thousands of terabytes).ltiple petabytes (thousands of terabytes).
Has description of metaphor, metonym, or other figurative expressionMost of the metaphors we use to talk aboutMost of the metaphors we use to talk about data in popular culture make sense to technocratic corporations and their leaders, those building and disseminating information technologies, but they are fundamentally dehumanizing. It is no wonder individuals continue to believe that they have “nothing to hide” in the face of big data, because we do not have the cognitive context to grasp how behemoth corporations use data. The dominant industrial metaphors for data do not privilege the position of the individual. Instead, they take power away from the person to which the data refers and give it to those who have the tools to analyze and interpret data. Data then becomes obscured, specialized, and distanced.omes obscured, specialized, and distanced.
Has function in sentence or vocabularynoun +
Has languageEnglish +
Has quotation or paraphrasequotation +
Has source of information in printGurin, Joel, Open Data Now: The Secret to Hot Startups, Smart Investing, Savvy Marketing, and Fast Innovation (New York: McGraw-Hill Education, 2014), 12 (italics omitted) +
Has source of information onlineWatson, Sara M., “Data is the New ‘___’: Sara M. Watson on the Industrial Metaphors of Big Data,” DIS Magazine, accessed October 9, 2015, http://dismagazine.com/discussion/73298/sara-m-watson-metaphors-of-big-data/ +, Lisa Arthur, “What Is Big Data?” Forbes, August 15, 2013, accessed August 21, 2015, http://www.forbes.com/sites/lisaarthur/2013/08/15/what-is-big-data/ + and Manyika, James, et al., Big data: The next frontier for innovation, competition, and productivity (n.p.: McKinsey Global Institute, 2011), 1, Aug. 21, 2015, http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/business_technology/big_data_the_next_frontier_for_innovation +
Is term or phraseBig Data +